Frequently Asked Questions

1. What are Temporary Works?

2. How early should I consider Temporary Works?

3. Why do I need a Temporary Works Coordinator?

4. What does a Temporary Works Coordinator do?

5. What does a Temporary Works Supervisor do?

6. What is on a Temporary Works Register?

7. What happens when Temporary Works go wrong?

8. What are Permanent Works?

 

 

1. What are Temporary Works?

Temporary works are the short-term components of your construction process that provide structural or engineering support during the construction of a permanent building.

These structures typically include access scaffolds, props, shoring, hoardings, excavation support, falsework and formwork. In projects such as haul road foundations, crane or piling platforms may be incorporated into the permanent works.

2. How early should I consider Temporary Works?

Temporary works should be considered before the building stage begins. Contractors should appoint a Temporary Works Coordinator to evaluate, design, inspect and approve the temporary works before site use.

A Temporary Works Coordinator works closely with the contractor, relevant stakeholders and the design team to ensure that all risks are minimised.

3. Why do I need a Temporary Works Coordinator? 

British Standard 5975 stipulates that the management of temporary works on medium and large projects requires the appointment of a Temporary Works Coordinator (TWC).

Although the Standard does not have any legal requirements pertaining to this job title, it does highlight best practice. Legally, the appointed individual should have the relevant knowledge and competence to fulfil the role. He or she should be equipped with the relevant experience so that that any risk of harm to workers or members of the public is mitigated at all times.

On larger projects, it is recommended that you appoint a qualified TWC with the relevant experience. On smaller projects, it is permissible to have someone take on the role provided they perform the duties in accordance with the best practices and ensure that the TW are properly managed.

4. What does a Temporary Works Coordinator do?

 Prior to the building process TWCs are responsible for communication with the relevant stakeholders and the design team. The initial phases of the building process require the TWC to create the temporary works register and design briefs.

Once the building process has begun their duties are to plan, manage and monitor the various temporary works that the site is using. These duties include inspection and quality checks.

5. What does a Temporary Works Supervisor do?

When the site is particularly large, or if there are more than one sites being managed, the TWC will most likely appoint a temporary works supervisor.

A supervisor will assist the TWC as well as the principal and/or sub-contractors to manage the temporary works process, helping to supervise implementation, maintenance and dismantling.

6. What is on a Temporary Works Register?

This is a document that is prepared prior to the building phase which includes all temporary works items associated with the project.

This may cover the design brief, description of recommended temporary works, the date required, the category of temporary works, details of the designer and design monitor, the date of design completion, a report on checks and approvals, and anything else relevant to the project.

7. What happens when Temporary Works go wrong?

Temporary works go wrong when there is no TEC on site, where contractors are not competent and when there is a lack of procedure, Being underprepared leaves your workers and site members at serious risk of injury or death.

Consequences for contractors and stakeholders include suspension, fines and even imprisonment.

This is why it is essential that you not only consider temporary works from the outset, but that you choose a reliable, experienced and proven contractor to help you design and oversee them.

8. What are Permanent Works?

These are the final outcomes of a construction project, such as buildings, bridges, roads, retaining features or any structures that will remain in position for 60 years or longer.

Producing high quality permanent works requires the use of various forms of temporary works depending on the project and need the supervision of a temporary works coordinator or supervisor.